FREE Ground Shipping on $60 or more. Use coupon code SHIP2ME4FREE at checkout. Not valid with other coupon offers.

How to Make Aguas Frescas also called Mexican Coolers

Bookmark This Page
Submit an Article
More Articles Like This
Check out our Mexican Beverages Concentrates section!

Aguas Frescas - Mexican Coolers

The Mexican beverages known as Aguas Frescas are an awe-inspiring complement to Mexico's cuisine. They're wonderfully unique and refreshing ... plus they provide a perfect balance to the spiciness of the food.



Vitrolero or Vitroleros are huge glass or plastic containers of Aguas Frescas can be found at street stands all over Mexico, usually featuring whatever fruits are currently in season. Super healthy and oh-so-simple to make, these drinks only require three essential ingredients: fruit, water and sugar. How much easier can it get than that? Don't let the simplicity of these recipes fool you. The flavors will amaze you, and you just may find yourself hooked!



Following are recipes for several Aguas Frescas. However ... you can buy a mix for each of them here at MexGrocer. And ... if you click at the links, in addition to Aguas de Tamarindo, Jamaica, Melón, Sandía and Horchata recipes ... you can buy mixes for Mango, Strawberry, Pineapple, Guava and Piña Colada drinks!



So ... what's stopping you?



Agua de Tamarindo (Tamarind-flavored Water)



Tamarinds are used frequently in both Thai and Indian cooking. In Mexico they're hugely popular and are regularly used to make aguas dulces, or sweet waters. They're also used to make dulces de tamarindo, or tamarind candies. The pods of the tamarind tree are used in this delicious, unique drink. This recipe takes about an hour to prepare and another hour or so to chill. It makes a half gallon. Or, to buy a quick and easy mix for Agua de Tamarindo at MexGrocer click here at, Agua de Tamarindo.

20 tamarindo pods(three packages)
2 quarts water
1 1/2 cups sugar (or to taste)

Peel the tamarindo pods, removing the veins that run along the sides. Leave the seeds.



In medium saucepan, bring one quart water to a boil. Add peeled tamarindo pods. Boil over high heat for approximately 15 minutes, or until the pulp is soft.



Remove from heat and let cool until the pulp is ready to handle. Remove seeds from pulp and discard, along with any remaining bits of peel. Empty the saucepan into a blender. Add sugar and blend until liquified. Run the mixture through a strainer, discarding extra pulp. Pour into a pitcher and mix with remaining quart of water. Chill thoroughly before serving. Pour into tall, ice-filled glasses and serve.





Agua de Jamaica (Hibiscus Flower Water)

Dried hibiscus flowers, known in Mexico as jamaica (pronounced hah-MIKE-ah) are used to make this refreshing, delicious drink. Agua de Jamaica is a mild, natural diuretic. People who drink it for that reason often use a sugar substitute. This recipe takes takes about an hour to prepare and another hour or so to chill. It makes a half gallon. Or, if you'd rather buy a quick and easy mix for Agua de Jamaica

2 cups dried hibiscus flowers(2 packages)
2 quarts water
3/4 cup sugar (or to taste) - or equivalent amount of sugar substitute

Rinse and drain the hibiscus flowers in a colander. In medium saucepan, bring one quart of water to a boil. Add hibiscus flowers and sugar. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, for approximately 15 minutes. Mixture will be dark red in color.



Remove from heat and cool. Strain thoroughly and pour into a pitcher. Add remaining water and stir. Chill in a saucepan with 4 cups of the water and the sugar. Stir and bring to a slow boil, lower heat and simmer, covered, for 15 minutes. The flowers will have lost their color into the water, which will be a deep red color. Let the liquid cool, then run the mixture through a strainer. Pour into a pitcher and mix with remaining quart of water. Chill thoroughly before serving. Pour into tall, ice-filled glasses and serve.





Agua de Melón (Cantaloupe Water)

Delicious. Refreshing. Easy. A winner for sure. This recipe takes takes about 20 minutes to prepare and another hour or so to chill. It makes a half gallon. Or, if you'd rather buy a quick and easy mix for Agua de Melón

1 canteloupe, diced, with seeds and rind discarded
6 cups water
½ cup sugar (or to taste)

Place half of diced cantaloupe in blender, along with two cups of the water. Blend until liquified. Pour into a pitcher. Place remaining cup of watermelon in blender, along with two more cups water. Blend thoroughly and pour into pitcher. Add remaining two cups of water and sugar. Stir until sugar is completely dissolved. Chill thoroughly before serving. Pour into tall, ice-filled glasses and serve.



Agua de Sandía (Watermelon Water)

Agua de Sandía (pronounced Sahn-DEE-yah) is a particular favorite with kids! Another winner-for sure. This recipe takes about 20 minutes to prepare and another hour or so to chill. It makes a half gallon. Or, if you'd rather buy a quick and easy mix for Agua de Sandía!

2 cups diced seedless watermelon, with rind removed
6 cups water
1/2 cup sugar (or to taste)

Place one cup diced watermelon in blender, along with two cups of the water. Blend until liquified. Pour into a pitcher. Place remaining cup of watermelon in blender, along with two more cups water. Blend thoroughly and pour into pitcher. Add remaining two cups of water and sugar. Stir until sugar is completely dissolved. Chill thoroughly before serving. Pour into tall, ice-filled glasses and serve.





Horchata (Rice-Cinnamon Drink)

Although Horchata (pronounced or-CHAT-ah) is not really a fruit drink, it's served in the same way, and on the same occasions as Aguas Frescas. The unusual blend of rice, sugar and cinnamon makes this a preferred drink of many Mexicans. You can often find Horchata in Mexican restaurants-made fresh daily. This recipe must be made in two parts, over a six to eight hour stretch. The first part of the recipe takes five minutes, max. The second takes about 20 minutes to prepare and an hour or so to chill. Makes 2 ½ quarts. Or, if you'd rather buy a quick and easy mix for Horchata,

2 cups long-grained white rice
2 cups water
2 quarts low or non-fat milk
1 cup sugar
2 tsp vanilla
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Place the rice in a bowl with enough hot water to cover it completely. Seal bowl with plastic wrap and let stand, at room temperature, for six to eight hours, or overnight. The next day, strain rice through a colander, discarding water. Place one cup water and two cups milk in blender with one cup of rice. Blend until liquified. Pour into a pitcher. Repeat with other half of milk, water and rice. Pour through a strainer to remove extra rice pulp. Mix in sugar, vanilla and cinnamon and stir until sugar is completely dissolved. Chill thoroughly before serving. Pour into tall, ice-filled glasses and serve.



 


Recipe and tips provided by Ann Hazard.





Join author Ann Hazard, as she leads you through four generations of historic Baja culinary adventure. She shares not only her family's favorite travel tales, but also the delicious, easy-to-prepare recipes she has collected and created. By the time you've cooked a meal or two and finished reading the book, you're guaranteed a lasting dose of Baja Magic. The book may even turn your perspective slightly to the South, lighten your heart and forever transform your outlook on life!




Mexican Food
1.877.463.9476

4060 Morena Blvd.
Suite C
San Diego, CA 92117
© 2014 MexGrocer.com LLC.
All rights reserved.